Tag Archives: olympics

Your Favorite Winter Olympics Sport – Capture the Everyday

First, a HUGE “Thank You” to Melissa Culbertson, who hosted Capture the Everyday on her early blog, Adventuroo. She kindly gave me permission to start it up again!

Yes, I’ve been on a blog-cation for many weeks. I’m finally treading water again, and I’m looking for more people who want to be positive about the little things in life! I’m still working on my badge and suggestions are welcomed!

CapturetheEveryday

Link up below with a post, write a comment, or just post a picture. I’ll be doing this every Monday (next week’s topic announced below). If you are linking to a blog post THANK YOU! And it would be wonderful if you would use just a simple link to my site to help spread the word.

So here’s my personal favorite Winter Olympic sport: Ice Dancing. I used to love Figure Skating, but now that everyone and their sister can do a triple axle it appears so emotionally devastating for the young competitors that I enjoy something that requires not only athletic ability and skill on the ice; but drama, emotion, and a clear connection to the musical choices.

I adored Trovill & Dean’s performance of Ravel’s Bolero, which took Gold in the 1984 Olympics.

They competed again in 1994 with an incredible revised routine with the same music, but only took home a Bronze medal. I can’t find it on YouTube, but it was brilliant.

What’s your favorite? Why? Has that always been your favorite? I want to know!!

{Next week is about your furbabies. Past, current, future, or all of the above!}



A Book Signing, Back to School Shopping, and the Bedroom from Hell

— 1 —

Wednesday I went to a book signing for Katie McGarry’s new release, Pushing the Limits.  It was standing room only, and Katie had all of us laughing one minute and on the brink of tears the next as she chronicled her journey to this day, the day of her debut novel’s release.  I won’t spoil the book for you, but I just want to say this is a book that will not be limited to the YA audience alone.  Katie is a woman with a gift.  I know she worked hard on this book, and is currently working hard on her second and third book, but no one writes such evocative prose without a God-given gift.  The moment Katie was conceived God smiled and said, “She’ll be a writer.”  Here’s a picture from the signing, just so I can say, “I knew her before she was famous.”

— 2 —

On a much less uplifting note, John and I went shopping for school supplies this week.  One-hundred fifty dollars worth of school supplies.  Of course one hundred dollars of that was the calculator he needs for his AP Math classes, and it’s the same model Aaron is still using in his junior year of college, so it’s a long-term investment. I did not buy the ream of paper on the supplies list.  I realize money is tight and I did buy the paper towels, tissues, dry erase markers, red pens, hand sanitizer, and other things I know are all for the entire class or the teacher to use.  But I can’t pick up a ream of paper, nor do I expect my son to carry a ream of paper on the bus with him.  I’ll probably tuck a $10 Target gift card into the bag with the other non-personal supplies, though, because I know too many teachers end up buying class supplies out of their own pockets.  As for the calculator, I asked Aaron to help John learn to use it.  This is what happens when you ask a twenty-year-old to help his thirteen-year-old brother with a new electronic device:

— 3 —

I was straightening the house and putting all the back-to-school stuff together (piled on the dining room table, of course) when I realized I hadn’t seen John’s lunchbag since Camp Shakespeare.  You know, the camp that ended a month ago.  So I asked him to find it for me.  It still had the last day of camp’s plastic lunch container in it.  I don’t know what sort of fruit I sent that day, but there was enough mold in that container to provide penicillin for a serious infection.

— 4 —

Then I started looking for John’s school clothes.  His school has a strict dress code, so basically he lives in khaki pants and white polos.  I looked in his dresser drawers first, which were all empty.  All of them.  Then I tried the closet, where I found enough polos to clothe his entire class, but a good portion of them dingy and stained.  I’m trying to get them looking a bit nicer to avoid buying new ones, since the pants I eventually found (in a pile behind his bed) were in pretty awful shape.  New ones are on the way from Old Navy.

— 5 —

You know where this is headed, right?  It’s time to clean his room.  He’s going to do it, not me, and we decided the date fairly.  If I won the game of Jenga he’d clean Thursday, and if he won he’d clean Friday.  I won.  Here are the “before” pictures, and as you can imagine, one day just wasn’t enough.  I’ll post “after” pictures once we reach that point.

John's room

John's room

— 6 —

I’m completely caught up in the Olympics.  I haven’t had the opportunity to see this much coverage since I was a kid, because when you get up at 3am for work you can’t watch prime-time TV, and even if you tape it to watch later anything interesting that happened will be discussed all around you the next day by people who watched the coverage and slept until 8am and it’s just not as much fun to watch when you already know the outcome.  I’ve been staying off Twitter and not listening to the radio so nothing is spoiled for me.  When my husband came home Wednesday he was dying to tell me the results of the day’s events and I wouldn’t let him.  Then I realized I was going out to dinner and to a crowded book signing, so I added this accessory.

It didn’t work.  One of my dinner companions still told me some of the results.  Not Women’s Gymnastics, thankfully, or I might have had to hurt her.

— 7 —

Lastly, I am pretty excited about a small change on my blog that has given it a much cleaner look.  You know all those buttons we like to have, and in some cases are required to have to do sponsored posts?  And how much room they take up?  Well, I had no idea this was even possible, but Aaron created a “slideshow” of buttons, so that they are all there, and all get seen, but they take up the space of just one button!  And he resized my blog so it is more easily viewable in all browsers.  If you want to get on his design list before he gets busy with his junior year computer science classes check out his work on my site (if you’re reading this in an email or in a reader) or at his site, Eagle Blog Design.

For more Quick Takes, visit Conversion Diary!

Priced at just $4.99, it is now available in every format your little heart could desire at Smashwords, or, if you prefer, it’s also for sale in a Kindle version at Amazon or a Nook version at Barnes and Noble!

In Which I Admit My Lack of Knowledge of International Politics

— 1 —

For those of you who haven’t already heard, I did finally get a check from CIGNA for mid-May through mid-July.  And supposedly I am approved through mid-September (my next neurosurgeon appointment) so I should have checks coming in mid-July and mid-August, but I’m not holding my breath.  One interesting point is that a few days after I got the check I got the letter saying my payment had been approved (it usually works that way).  But the letter said that after my functionality exam they had “reversed their decision” and “reopened my case” to approve and pay me.  Really?  So at some point between mid-May and mid-July my claim was denied and my case closed and no one bothered to tell me?  Yep, keeping that letter for if/when I need to go to the commissioner of Insurance.  I also no longer have phone conversations with these people.  Email only, and I print everything out.

— 2 —

My youngest cousin was in a horrible car accident last week and is still in intensive care in Ohio.  His neck is broken and they have been unable to get him off the ventilator.  To compound the problem a huge medication error was made and he was given thirty milligrams of a sedative that is normally given in five milligram doses. Did you know July is the month in which the most mistakes by far are made in teaching hospitals across the United States?  It’s the first month of residency for new medical school graduates and as a nurse I can tell you most of these residents are completely unprepared for the real world of patient care.  Please keep him in your prayers – he’s a wonderful young man who is terrified, confused, unable to communicate, and looking at a long, painful road to recovery.

— 3 —

My husband sets his alarm his about ninety minutes before he really needs to get up.  He’s one of those people who wake up slowly.  I never really knew this about him because before my third surgery I had always been at work for several hours before his alarm went off.  He wakes and turns on the TV.  One of those shows where people sit on a sofa and talk about the day’s news.  Since I basically laid around like a slug, feeling like crap, all day yesterday today I poured myself some iced coffee and watched with him.  Good idea, right?  Not so much.

— 4 —

While my husband has strong political views and is well-informed on political and historical issues (I’ve always thought he’d make a fabulous history teacher) he doesn’t really want to chat about world events or answer my questions about international politics at six a.m.  Neither does he want to hear my rants about how wasteful is it for political candidates to spend massive amounts of money on their campaigns (yes, I know, it’s private money people have donated, but still!) when the economy of this country is in its current state.

— 5 —

Therefore, I will ask the question here and suffer the consequences.  Yes, I do realize that after reading this question you will wonder how I got through high school, let alone college, and probably stop following my blog in disgust, but please answer first.  Do other democratic countries throw this much money at political candidates?  Isn’t there a better way?  It’s only July and I’m already sick of the negative ads and mud-slinging.  And it’s not like we can just watch the news or read the paper to find out more about political candidates.  Two different station, two different papers, will give you completely different stories.

— 6 —

On a lighter note, I got John’s back-to-school packet with all the forms and his school supply list.  I do love back-to-school shopping, especially since I now have enough money in my bank account to cover more than pencils 😉  I will not, however, be going to the completely disorganized registration.  Last year I stood in line over two hours to turn in forms, was barely able to walk back to my car, then dry-swallowed two pain pills and a muscle relaxer and drove quickly home, where I stayed in bed for two days.  Not happening.  I’ll mail it in or send it all with John the first day of school, whichever they prefer.

— 7 —

Opening ceremonies for the London Olympics are today, and even though there will be no official recognition of the forty Israeli Olympians who were slain forty years ago today I will certainly be thinking about them and their families and praying for the safety of all the young men and women gathered for the Olympic Games.

For more Quick Takes, visit Conversion Diary!

Priced at just $4.99, it is now available in every format your little heart could desire at Smashwords, or, if you prefer, it’s also for sale in a Kindle version at Amazon or a Nook version at Barnes and Noble!

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